Do you eat Amaranth?

Here’s why you should!

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By now we all know quinoa, buckwheat and chia seeds, but are you familiar with the super grain Amaranth?
I was first introduced to Amaranth in 2009 while working on a yoga retreat in Ibiza, Spain.
There, some people ate it for breakfast like a porridge, adding honey, dried fruit, cinnamon or almond butter.
Seven years later I’m finally adding it my diet! It’s fun to try something new and to create some recipes from a food I don’t know too well.

What is Amaranth anyway?

There are actually about 60 different varieties of Amaranth, but three species in particular are grown for their edible seeds.
Similar to how cashews aren’t really nuts, and how quinoa isn’t really a grain, Amaranth isn’t technically a cereal grain, but a seed of the Amaranth plant. It does however have a nutrient profile similar to grains and like Chia, was a staple of the Aztecs.

Benefits of Amaranth

  • It’s a hearty plant and can thrive in high altitudes as well as low-water conditions.
  • High in protein – 9 grams in 1 cup of cooked Amaranth.
  • Lowers LDL cholesterol – the “bad” one.
  • Raises HDL – that’s the good one.
  • High in calcium – 110 mg.
  • High in iron – 5mg – twice the amount of quinoa!
  • High in fiber – 5 grams.
  • Gluten free.
  • Easy to make.
  • What to do with it?

  • Cook some at the beginning of the week as part of your food prep and keep on hand.
  • Add popped amaranth to yogurt or salads.
  • Make homemade bars or powerbombs.
  • Use it as a coating similar to how you would with cornmeal.
  • Make it as a side dish like rice or couscous.
  • Here’s a recipe I’m working on perfecting: Lentil Amaranth Cakes

    Got any ideas? Share your Amaranth recipes below!

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